Search Site: OnlineNigeria

Close






Nigerians Hold Yar’Adua Must Go Protests In Canada

Posted by The PM News on 2008/10/16 | Views: 2293 |

Nigerians Hold Yar’Adua Must Go Protests In Canada


Angry Nigerians in Toronto Stopped the Nigerian Ambassador to Canada, Professor Iyorwuese Hagher from Attending Nigerian Independence Day Dance in Toronto

Angry Nigerians in Toronto Stopped the Nigerian Ambassador to Canada, Professor Iyorwuese Hagher from Attending Nigerian Independence Day Dance in Toronto

The protests against the Nigerian government on Saturday in Toronto, effectively prevented the new ambassador to Canada, Professor Iyorwuese Hagher, from attending the “Independence Day Dance” organised by the Nigerian Canadian Association (NCA).

The group said they were tired of celebrating Nigeria’s “Independence Day” when the nation has known no development or independence since the British colonial masters left in 1960. They also took serious exception to the passivity of Nigerians abroad whom they accuse of colluding with bad Nigerian leaders at home either by celebrating their failures in foreign lands or by refusing to do something about the conditions of the Nigerian people.

The group’s leader, Majek Adega, told SaharaReporters that they could not accept a situation where Umaru Yar’Adua would be sending an Ambassador to represent his regime in Canada when everyone knows very well that he did not win any elections.

He said, “Yar’Adua is not entitled to nominate an ambassador to represent Nigeria in Canada. Where did he derive the legitimacy from to ask anyone to represent him?”

Trouble started when the group signaled their protest intentions at the venue of the event to the NCA. In his response, Prof. Hagher sent word to the protesters asking them to send their letter of complaint for onward remittance to Yar’Adua.

Predictably, that infuriated the group further. Its members loudly rejected the idea, claiming that Nigerian problems are well known to all and sundry and that it was an insult on the intelligence of Nigerians for the ambassador to request that a petition be written about them for the Nigerian “president”.

Although Ambassador Hagher had travelled to Toronto from Ottawa, about 280 miles away, he was effectively prevented from attending the event, which commenced at 6:00p.m. The protesters arrived at the venue ahead of that time at 5:40 p.m. and took their positions, armed with placards denouncing the Yar’adua government.

They did not leave the place until 10:00p.m. when word reached them that the Ambassador had sent someone else to represent him and deliver his speech.

Sources told SaharaReporters that the ambassador was holed up in his hotel room in downtown Toronto.

Before dispersing, the group vowed to keep mobilizing all Nigerians abroad, who are dissatisfied with the sorry state of affairs at home to start boycotting official events by the Yar’Adua government until free and fair elections are held.

It is not known whether the Ambassador has reported his experience to Abuja.

Analysts say Toronto could be the beginning of similar protests by frustrated Nigerians all over the world to draw the attention of the international community to the terrible conditions at home and send a strong message to the Nigerian government.

Meanwhile, Yar’Adua has said his administration will do everything possible within available resources and constitutional provision to solve the problems in the Niger Delta.

The President said this while receiving a delegation of South-South leaders who paid him a visit in the State House, Abuja yesterday.

President Yar’Adua said with the creation of the Niger Delta Ministry, his administration was now poised to begin the implementation of its agenda for infrastructure development, tackling the problem of environmental challenges and youth empowerment confronting Niger Delta.

He acknowledged that though the 1999 Constitution may not be a perfect document and that its amendment was necessary, the president said it is not a preoccupation of his administration to engineer another elaborate effort at constitutional review.

He added that “to tie our efforts in the Niger Delta to constitutional amendments would be a distraction at this point.”

Referring to the Niger Delta crisis as “a national problem,” the president urged those canvassing constitutional amendments to go through the National Assembly.

“While I have no objections to your feelings about constitutional amendment, I strongly believe we have to follow the procedures,” hesaid.

He added that “building a just, prosperous and equitable society is not an easy thing,” as it “requires patience, efforts and perseverance.”

President Yar’Adua, who thanked the South-South leaders for “frankly airing their views” and for their sacrifices to bringing peace not only to the Niger Delta but to the nation, assured them that his doors would “always be open to listen to advice and opinions that will help us find a lasting solution to national problems like that of Niger Delta.”

The leader of the 11-member delegation, Justice Adolphus Karibi Whyte, explained that they had come to present the resolutions of the Vanguard-organised South-South Legislative Retreat on Constitutional Review held in August 2008, to the Federal Government.

Part of the resolutions include amending the current Constitution to restore “true federalism.”

He commended the establishment of the Ministry of Niger Delta.

The delegation included Vanguard Publisher, Mr. Sam Amuka; Chief Edwin Clark, Mr. Ledum Mitee, Chief John Oyegun and Sen. Felix Ibru while Vice- President Goodluck Jonathan, the Ministers of Petroleum, Transportation and Science and Technology, and the NDDC Managing Director, Mr Timi Alaibe, also attended.

Read Full Story Here.... :
Leave Comment Here :



Add Comment

* Required information
1000
Captcha Image

Comments (1)

Gravatar
New
Fay(Katy, Texas, US)says...

Actually translates to bravehearted.